Can Throat Cancer get Cured?

Can Throat Cancer Be Cured?

Cancer, according to general notion, is an incurable ailment. So, folks have been made to believe that situations involving cancer are irredeemable in most cases. As true as that is, there are cancerous situations that are exemptions. One of such is “Throat Cancer,” which is very much curable if detected early and handled duly.


At the early stage, cancers of the throat are small, localized, and highly curable either by surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, biological therapy, or a combination of these treatment techniques. However, multi-modality treatment, which is treatment using two or more techniques, is more likely to be the most promising means of increasing a patient’s chance to be cured.

But then, a patient’s situation may influence the application method of these general treatment principles and even his or her decision to receive the treatment, hence the ultimate need to strike a careful balance of the potential benefits of receiving treatment with the potential risks.


Patients with throat cancer have various treatment options which can facilitate a mutual or shared decision-making process with a treating cancer physician. By nature, treatment of throat cancer is multi-modality. This is because of the different activities that the throat is responsible for, ranging from talking, swallowing, and breathing. Consequent upon this, the type of treatment that will minimize the impact on these important functions is recommendable.

More so, treatment may be dictated by how it affects a patient’s appearance, and thus, quality of life. In cases of early stage throat cancer, the most common treatment is surgery, which has resulted in the cure of over 80% of patients. Radiation therapy is another means through which cancer of the throat can be handled, which produces similar results to that of surgery.


Can Throat Cancer Be Cured?

Over 400 patients with cancer of the tonsil who were involved in clinical studies showed results which indicated that the use of radiation therapy alone or with surgery to remove only cancerous lymph nodes afforded cure rates as good as those typically achieved with more extensive surgery but with less severe complications. According to this study, 100% of stage I disease patients survived, and 85% of stage II disease survived 5 years after the treatment was completed.

So, throat cancer situations, if detected early, can be salvaged with the aid of acceptable cancer treatment methods as stated above.