Google to Start Blocking Flash in Chrome

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senior vice president of Google Chrome, speaks during Google I/O Conference at Moscone Center in San Francisco, California June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) - RTR34B4Y

I have been jumping from one web page to another for the better part of today, and nothing has caught my attention as much as this particular news did. I just didn’t know how to feel, or what mood I should put on as I am not a big fan of Google Chrome, but the funny thing here is that most of our readers use this browser, and you guys just want to have an idea of what this news really spells; well, took my laptop, off to the closest café and here it is.

By the fourth quarter of this year, there are plans by Google to make HTML5 the primary experience in Chrome; the company stated that only 10 websites that are on Google’s so-called white list will be able to run the Adobe flash player. The new plan, called “HTML5 by default,” spells that every downloaded or shipped version of the Chrome browser will continue to come with Adobe’s flash player, but the only difference here is that the presence of the flash player will not be advertised by default.

For sites that need flash, the user will get a prompt on the top of the page at a first-time visit to the site, but if a site should offer HTML5, it will be the default experience. Just as I stated, users will get a prompt at the top of the page, and this prompt is actually designed to give the user an option to either run or not run flash on the site, when the user accepts to run flash, Chrome will automatically advertise the presence of flash player and it will refresh the page. After the first visit to a website, a user will not be seeing prompts as the first time selection becomes a default setting, but Google said it will work on having future prompts pop-up.

Well, this has been an era of significant change on the web. Flash, which was very significant to having rich media on a web page, is gradually being sidelined by HTML5 which has suddenly become a serious competitor as Google and other big players are backing it. We may enjoy HTML5 to some extent, though, because I have personally noticed that it provides a more integrated media experience with faster load times and lower power consumption. This is in stark contrast to Adobe’s flash player which has had a track record for having vulnerabilities and also exposing users to various threats.

HTML5 is newer when compared to Adobe’s flash player, and since Adobe’s flash player was well hyped at its inception, let’s just hope that the HTML5 continues to live up to the hype and the big support it is enjoying.

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Back in November 2015, Adobe systems had said that it would offer tools that will help in developing HTML5 contents while continuing to support flash contents. But while the HTML5 has the standard that's needed to carry the web platform across all devices, we wouldn’t be very wrong to call it “the future.”

Google will begin the initial shipping of Chrome with a white-list of the top 10 sites using flash, this list has been sorted by the aggregate usage of a specific domain. These 10 sites will likely include Youtube.Com, Facebook.Com, Amazon.Com, and Mail.Ru. The company has said that the white list will continue to be updated and all sites whose usage no longer requires special attention will be removed and replaced.

 

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